How & Why

Is Your Child Academically Ready For Kindergarten? (Part 1)

Welcome to our several part series where we walk you through how to make sure your child is academically READY FOR KINDERGARTEN!

How does this help you? We’re glad you asked! Throughout our series, we’ll teach you everything you need to know to make sure your child is ready for kindergarten. We know it can be stressful and overwhelming. Kindergarten is a HUGE transition for children and parents. Stick with us and we’ll help you make the transition easier!

Getting Academically Ready for Kindergarten with Pre-K Complete

You may be a parent who gets STRESSED out thinking about kindergarten so you put off planning for it. Maybe you say to yourself, “My child doesn’t start kindergarten for another year or six months, I don’t need to worry about it right now.” This can easily turn into, “Kindergarten starts in 2 weeks and I have no idea if my child is academically ready or what to do for it!”

You may be a parent who is a SERIOUS PLANNER. You’ve been working with your child since birth to make sure they were on the right track for school. You don’t want them to be behind in anything, so you enrolled them in preschool or you may just work with them at home. You may still be asking yourself, “Did I miss teaching my child an important skill?” How will they do in kindergarten?”

It’s okay if you’re the stressed parent, the serious planner, or you find yourself somewhere in between. Our series of articles on how to ensure your child is academically ready for kindergarten will help you.

Here’s a sneak peak what you can look forward to:

  • How to easily assess if your child is ready for kindergarten.
  • How to help prepare your child for kindergarten without stressing out.
  • What to look for in a preschool program.
  • What is Common Core and why does everyone keep talking about it.

Why is getting children academically ready for kindergarten so important?

We get asked this question a lot. Back in the day, children would attend childcare while their parents were at work. The majority of the day was spent playing with toys, coloring, or maybe taking a nap. There wasn’t a big push for early childhood education like there is today. So what has changed?

** A lot of time and money has gone into research programs that follow children from birth through school and into their career. Information was gathered to determine why these people either did WELL or POORLY in school, if they went to college, and their job or career. Bottom line, the children who were academically ready, emotionally, and socially prior to entering kindergarten were the ones who performed the best.

Early Childhood Education is KEY to academic and future success.

Children who are properly prepared for kindergarten start their first day CONFIDENT and ready to LEARN! They jump right in and participate with the class. This is the ideal situation that we want every child to be in.

Children who enter kindergarten unprepared tend to fall behind very quickly. Once behind, it is very difficult to catch up. Nearly two-thirds of American children entering kindergarten are unprepared academically. We DO NOT want this to be your child. With our guidance and support, you can help MAKE SURE your child is academically ready for his/her first day of kindergarten. And hey, we’ll make it fun and not so stressful!


Where do we go from here?

Learn about The Importance of Preschool Assessments and How to Make it Easy here.

Start preparing your child for kindergarten today! Check out all our fun learning activities at the Pre-K Complete store at Teachers Pay Teachers! We think you’ll like them.

Pre-K, Kindergarten, First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Higher Education, Adult Education, Homeschooler, Staff - TeachersPayTeachers.com

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    2 Ways to Know if Your Child’s Writing Skills are Ready for Kindergarten
    August 1, 2016 at 9:32 pm

    […] Did you miss part 1 of this series? No worries! You can read it here. […]

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